Dr Sister Outlaw books a table for one at Becasse

The other night I found myself in Sydney, all alone, at the end of two extremely interesting but tiring weeks of work-related learnings. Something about the blueness of the autumn sky, and the sudden freedom of completing my duties, infected me with hedonism. I decided that I would do something I’d not done for a long, long time and buy myself a scarily expensive meal. After spending most of the day thinking about it, I booked a table for one at Becasse. After a trip to the beach, to catch the last warm waves of the season, and buying myself a new pair of red shoes, I was there. Alone.

Dining alone is a curious experience. I remember being told, by a much older woman I admired 21 years ago, that the measure of a restaurant is how they treat the solo diner. Her name was Lynn and her gold standard was the legendary 1980s restaurant Stephanie’s, whose staff did not sit the solo diner at a table next to the kitchen, but put them in the best seat, so as to shower them with discreet attention. As Lynn pointed out, the food and a good book should substitute for lack of companionship, and being alone should never be a reason not to partake of all the best that chefs have to offer. I’ve never forgotten Lynn’s example and have often eaten alone often and happily. But restaurants as splendid as Becasse are restaurants for romantic encounters, or significant life events, or, if one is truly vulgar, proving your financial muscle to people you want to impress. I’ve never really considered going to such a place alone. My Crush, stuck at home and unable to accompany me asked, won’t you feel awkward being by yourself? I thought I wouldn’t, but I needed to test that.

I’m so glad I did. My booking was last minute, but the lovely bloke who answered the phone explained that he did only have two tables, and I would be near the kitchen, but he hoped I wouldn’t mind and I would find the staff friendly. The only indication he gave that he thought my request for a table for one was odd was asking me if I was in the food industry. No, I assured him, but I did want to eat a really good meal. I knew by his tone that I would, and the night would be good.

It was. The ambience of the restaurant is late 70s, with lots of black and white velvet wallpaper, gold and smoked glass, and frivolous chandeliers. There was almost one staff member per table, and a phalanx of chefs. I had forgotten how spoiling it is to eat silver service, but they did it in a way that was completely unfussy and laid back. The lovely woman in charge of the food had the motherliness you’d expect to find over a bar on the Central Coast, and none of the staff were hipsters. Who’d have thought that?

I love going to a restaurant with someone with a good palate and unpacking the food, but being alone meant I could focus completely, and not feel self-conscious for it, as I might have with a friend or a date. The food deserved the attention. Big kitchens do things you could never do at home – emulsions and gels and foams you would only bother with if you were a bit demented, and they pride themselves on flourishes, such as making little sculptures of marinated baby heirloom vegetables with crumbled olives and purees of beetroot and peas (please excuse the grainy iPhone pictures – it was dark in there and I thought it would have been rude to pull out the flash, or use my proper camera). 
Despite such amusing frippery, it was all underpinned by some very decent cooking – French-based, Asian influenced and rounded out with a deep knowledge of wholefoods and craft. The breads, for instance, were outstanding examples of a skilled baker’s work (the little green block in the bread picture is a fascinating but unnecessary emulsion of olive oil, while the white one was an emulsion of butter and pork fat, which I did not taste as I am a friend of the pig). Apparently Justin North, who owns Becasse, is opening new digs and a bakery across the road – I suggest you go there as soon as it opens. Just ignore the emulsions.

Other highlights were the delicate punch of wagyu and tuna in a beef and tomato consomme, the smokiness of scallops with miso and magically simple things; toasted buckwheat crumbled on top of scallops; the consistency of the chocolate mousse, with its glazed surface; the delight of creamy pannacotta at the bottom of a cup of mandarin granita. Nine of the ten courses were extraordinary, blending seafoods, beef and smoked flavours with lots of variations on potato and light, light dressings. It wasn’t perfect: the eggs with legumes were foamy and it was all too salty, but only the last savoury course was entirely disappointing, because the chicken was tough and the lemon pith overpowering. Still, this was the flaw that kept my feet on the ground and I was wowed by the smoked scallops, the various versions of potato, the wagyu and yellowfin, the savoury biscotti with goats cheese, those pumpkin and rosemary brioches, and that chocolate mousse.

And, as it turned out, being near the open kitchen was quite entertaining. I could hear the machinery of the restaurant and the calm, well-drilled voices of the head chefs as they pulled together the tiny elements of dishes they’d prepped all day. I had my back to them, but a piece of smoked glass in front of me provided a perfect reflection of what they were doing, and this meant I had a kind of chef TV, as well as a great view of the restaurant. And they could not see me watching them …

Dining alone was a wonderful experience. After two hours, when I was getting a bit restless but had eaten through only eight of the 10 courses, I fell into the closing pages of The Great Gatsby, and floated away. Then it was time to go. When the bill came I signed the credit card without a flourish, then poured myself out into the night, full of happiness and pride for spoiling myself so thoroughly.

So I’m sending thanks my old friend Lynn, wherever she is, for giving me the courage to eat alone in a fancy restaurant. I loved it Lynn. You knew I would.

[I have been wrestling with the alignment of the text with these photos but they will have to wait until Ms Zoe gets back from her holiday shenanigans to fix the blessed things. My bad.]

7 comments ↓

#1 Reemski on 21.04.11 at 9:16 am

Your lucky you chose Becasse, as it’s closing in the next couple of weeks. Such a lovely space, and I agree the staff there have always been top notch

#2 Pavlov's Cat on 21.04.11 at 9:57 am

Sounds glorious. I love eating out alone, but I only ever do it in other cities (other than Adelaide, I mean, which is sad because we are spoiled for choice when it comes to good restaurants) where it’s unlikely that people I know will turn up and take it for granted that I am to be felt sorry for, which is incredibly irritating from a feminist and other points of view, as is the assumption by strange men that one is there in order to be hit on, which thank God I am now too old to have to worry about. My model for attitude is MFK Fisher, who is very regal and take-no-prisoners about the solitary dining experience.

#3 dylan on 21.04.11 at 10:17 am

Onya DSO, i rather enjoy eating alone, i once heard Frank Thring sing the praises of eating alone in an interview and immediately went out and tried it, i didn’t get past the entree page, i had them all. lots of fun.

#4 Dr Sista Outlaw on 21.04.11 at 10:29 am

I think I heard something about that Reem, so I’m pleased I got to see the old room. Pav, being hit on would be vile! As would running into people you know. Fortunately I know few people who eat at two-hatted restaurants on Thursday nights, and I was two hours from home. And I was also tempted to eat all the entrees Dylan – a full degustation is hard work when one is entertaining oneself for three hours, but it does give the palate a good working over.

#5 Emica on 24.04.11 at 11:21 am

I love eating out alone. I haven’t treated myself in quite such luxurious surroundings but regularly popped into my favourite cafe for a plate of their amazing salads. The advantage of being solo is it’s so much easier to nab a spot even when it’s super busy and there are excellent eavesdropping opportunities without shushing The Man.

Sounds like a wonderful evening and well done for spoiling yourself :)

#6 Tammi on 03.05.11 at 10:58 am

Well done, DSO. Not sure whether you saw my post last year in Italy about dining alone – I’ve never been very good at it, but I learned a lot by having to do it every day for a couple weeks, and even learned to enjoy it. I think your point about the way you can enjoy such fine dining alone is really interesting in terms of the tensions between food being a conduit for community and the sheer aesthetic pleasure of really fine food… something more for me to think about! :-)

#7 Jessica on 26.05.11 at 10:02 am

sounds amazing!

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